10 facts you may not have known about Eastwood Park

Today Eastwood Park is known as a popular venue for weddings and events, but have you ever considered Eastwood Park’s rich history?

Highlights include a British Prime Minister, a companion to John Cabot, an important role in WW2 and a TV filming location – read on to reveal more about the venue you thought you knew!

1) Cabot's companion

The early members of the Jenkinson family were great travellers and seafaring men, including Anthony Jenkinson, who was the companion of Sebastian Cabot.

2) The Jenkinson Family

It was in the 18th century when the land was bought by Sir Charles Jenkinson. He was Seventh Baronet, First Baron of Hawkesbury and the First Earl of Liverpool. Charles’ son, Robert Banks Jenkinson, went on to become Prime Minister in 1812.

charles jenkinson

 

3) Royal clocks

The clock in the clocktower was cast by Benson, who was also clock maker to HRH Prince of Wales.

clocktower

 

4) Family motto

The stained glass window by the staircase has the Jenkinson family motto “pareo non servio” which means “I obey, I do not serve”.

stained glass window

 

5) Air raid precautions

During the Second World War, the Ministry of Home Security used Eastwood Park as an Air Raid Precautions School.

air raid precautions

 

6) Police training

The house was later used to train new police recruits, before being bought by the Department of Health in 1969.

police training

 

7) Large estate

The entire estate's grounds stretches over 200 acres!

200 acre estate

 

8) Custom gates

The Eastwood Park gates in the courtyard of the clock tower were specially made for us, crafted from wrought iron.

courtyard gates

 

9) Old features

Some features have not survived the passing of time, including the large turret on the porte-cochere and the orangery as seen here.

orangery

10) Television debut

In 2009, Eastwood Park served as a filming location for television shows such as Skins, Casualty, Holby City and Mistresses.

filming locations

. Hungry for more history? Visit our about us page.